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College Students Recycle Flower Waste into Organic Dyes, Help Destitute Women Earn a Livelihood

College Students Recycle Flower Waste into Organic Dyes, Help Destitute Women Earn a Livelihood

A group of college students from South Delhi's Aryabhatta college has started a unique initiative. They call it Project Palaash. Project Palaash aims to salvage floral waste and create organic dyes that are purely non-synthetic in nature. These organic dyes are then used on fabrics. These fabrics are dyed by the socially and economically underprivileged, thereby creating employment opportunities for destitute community members.

Gandhian Echo in the Age of Waste

Gandhian Echo in the Age of Waste

Mahatma Gandhi was no stranger to the problems of waste and he dedicated his entire life urging individuals to shun wasteful consumption. Here are a few schools that are living the Gandhian values of mindful consumption and efficient resource use.

India is drowning in waste. Every year we generate 62 million tonnes (MT) of waste and half of it ends up in landfills. Of the total waste collected, only 19 per cent undergoes treatment. This is the dismal state of waste management in our country today.

Mahatma Gandhi was no stranger to the problems of waste and he dedicated his entire life urging individuals to shun wasteful consumption. What was Gandhi’s mantra to reduce waste?

Toss it or eat it!

Toss it or eat it!

It is estimated that over 40 billion plastic kitchen utensils—including 14–18 billion plastic spoons—are produced every year. Given our low rate of reusing and recycling them, most of this cutlery ends up in landfill sites, or worse, in oceans and lakes! Here, they contaminate the land and soil for at least 450 years—the time plastic takes to degrade. Simply put, this is a recipe for disaster!

But there are edible alternatives, read on...

The Gift

The Gift

It was the last day of the outdoor adventure camp. The campsite was right in the middle of lush green nature with the ethereal mountains by the side. It was a treasure trove of rare flora and fauna, a perfect storybook destination. Kind and friendly villagers lived in the nearby hamlet. It was these sights and sounds, the warmth of the people around, the fresh unpolluted air and the collective experience of everything around that made Praveen come here again and again. Praveen was the camp in-charge. Every year in the month of May, Praveen and his team organised nature-connect sessions for children.